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Use the news in your classroom

Find resources for using the newspaper for almost any subject. These programs are updated weekly every Monday.

This Weeks's lesson:
Mexico restricts soft drink TV ads to fight obesity

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Answer FIVE Geography questions each week based on major news events.
Click here for the Geography Quiz Archive


This Weeks's lesson:

Federal agency warns about health risk of Alert Energy and other pure caffeine products

Move over, Red Bull, Monster Energy and Rock Star. Some people now use powdered caffeine as an alertness boost for studying, sports or other activities. But the potent powder -- sold online as Extreme Sport Beans, Cracker Jack'd , MiO Energy and...

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This Weeks's lesson:

GOP leaders run from Palin proposal

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Diversity, multiculturalism, worldwide events. You'll find plenty for classroom discussions in this listing of events.

View This Week in History

Tap the wealth of information in your newspaper as a teaching tool:

 Elementary (K-4)
 Middle (5-8)
 Secondary (9-12)

This week's word in the news: FRACKING

DEFINITION:
An abbreviated and altered term for hydraulic fracturing, which is the process of injecting a high-pressure fluid (usually water mixed with sand and “trade secret” chemicals) into subterranean rocks to force open existing fissures and extract oil or gas.

FOUND IN THE NEWS:
A new campaign ad that features the "Flat Earth Discussion Group," cheese by-products and a man with a sock puppet takes a humorous look at Colorado's fracking battle, but some voters aren't laughing.
The Denver Post -- 07/28/2014

CREATE YOUR OWN VOCABULARY QUIZ
 Elementary School
 Middle School
 High School


Back by popular demand

Children's book authors share their writing experience to help students learn more about the craft and techniques of creative writing.

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In the past nine years, Colorado River Basin — which covers Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona and California — has lost about 65 cubic kilometers of fresh water, nearly double the volume of the country’s largest reservoir, Lake Mead. About two-thirds of the water lost came from underground water supplies, rather than surface water.

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Become a Wildlife Watch Treasure Hunter

National Wildlife Federation’s Wildlife Watch is a national, nature-watching program created for people of all ages. Through the program, you’ll gain first hand experience with plants and animals in their natural environment and share details that help National Wildlife Federation track the health and behavior of wildlife and plant species nationwide. In return, the Wildlife Watch website keeps you up-to-date on wildlife news and facts, and new ideas for attracting wildlife to your backyard and community.

Click here to join the hunt today!


This Weeks's lesson:
Big Bang - The Beginning

When the universe was born, there was more light than matter.

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-- Jul 31, 2014

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