This ten-part series explores the science of natural disasters to reveal the human and economic toll caused by catastrophic events. Learn about a variety of natural disasters, as well as the tools and resources that can reduce the loss of life, damage to infrastructure, and the environment.

Click here to view this week's video installment

Complete Sixth Grade
Sustainability Curriculum

Publix Super Markets, Inc. has joined efforts with FPES (Florida Press Educational Services) to bring this program to sixth grade students. This FREE NIE Program will show your sixth grade students how to become responsible members of the planet, and to respect all of the resources that it has to offer.


Flip Chart for Interactive White Boards
Note: Only classrooms with white boards will be able to run this file.

Complete supplement as PDF

Teachers Guide

Lesson plans for use with the e-Edition on Interactive White Boards

Included are basic lessons for an Elementary, Middle and Secondary classroom that can be utilized to introduce Language Arts and Social Studies activities.

Middle School Social Studies Lesson Plan
Middle and High School Language Arts Lesson Plan
High School Social Studies Lesson Plan
Elementary Social Studies Lesson Plan
Elementary and Middle School Language Arts Lesson Plan

USA Weekend Teacher Guides

New Teacher's Guides are available every Monday, complete with monthly themes highlighted in a weekly lesson and a monthly activity sheet.

Click here to download guides from USA Weekend

Common Core State Standard
SL.CCS.1/2/3/4 Grades 6-12: An essay of a current news event is provided for discussion to encourage participation, but also inspire the use of evidence to support logical claims using the main ideas of the article. Students must analyze background information provided about a current event within the news, draw out the main ideas and key details, and review different opinions on the issue. Then, students should present their own claims using facts and analysis for support.


Movie rating change aims at shielding young viewers from smoking scenes

Rating letters are just one clue to picking an appropriate film. Invite pupils to use the newspaper's weekend entertainment section or pages as a research tool. See how much information individual students or teams can find about one new movie — including from ads.
Risks from certain behaviors or products are presented in health and science news coverage. Challenge students to find a recent article about nutrition, exercise, alcohol or tobacco. Ask them to evaluate whether it's clear, balanced and useful.
Critics of the effort to curb teen smoking through stricter movie ratings say parents and young filmgoers can decide what's appropriate. Solicit views on this topic and assign the class to compose one or two letters to the editor, expressing the opinions of audience members who are affected.

Heavy on-screen tobacco use now could bring an “R” rating for new films, according to the Hollywood watchdog group that decides whether releases are suitable for General audiences, should be flagged for Parental Guidance or limited to viewers older than 17. Moviegoers under 17 can see “R” films only if a parent or guardian tags along.

The Motion Picture Association of America ratings board, which previously considered underage smoking, now also will evaluate smoking by adults. That adds cigarettes, cigars and pipes to factors such as sex, violence and language that determine which of five ratings a film earns. Rating advisories appear on ads, trailers, in theaters and on video packages.

Film raters will consider the extent of tobacco use, whether it glamorizes smoking and the context. Movies set in the past, when smoking was more common, get a break.
Twenty-three percent of high school students smoke, according the surgeon general. That’s slightly above the adult rate of 21 percent, but skeptics say there is no indication that teens start to smoke because they see it depicted in films.

Watchdog says: “The rating system . . . is not intended to change behavior. It is for parents, so they can make informed decisions about what movies they do and don't want their kids to see." -- Seth Oster, executive vice-president. Motion Picture Association of America

Reviewer says: ”One does wonder where this will eventually lead. Do we give an R rating to a film that shows people eating hamburgers, since fatty foods can lead to heart disease? Do we give R ratings to all films showing cars speeding, since speeding can lead to fatal accidents? Can anyone be shown drinking and driving without the film being branded with an R?” – Tom Long, Detroit News film critic

Editorial says: “The rating likely will have little impact on smoking. . . . It seems relatively silly to restrict access to a movie that depicts something anyone — child or adult — can see while walking down any street in the country. . . . The best way to reduce tobacco use among all age groups is through education.” – The Reading (Pa.) Eagle

Front Page Talking Points is written by Felix Grabowski and Alan Stamm for, Copyright 2015
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