NIE Special Report


Who doesn’t like to eat?

Turn the fun of food into a great science experience to start off the school year using a new science content reading Is there a gene for liking broccoli? and an accompanying activity Taste this!

Click here to view the new material


Complete Sixth Grade
Sustainability Curriculum

Publix Super Markets, Inc. has joined efforts with FPES (Florida Press Educational Services) to bring this program to sixth grade students. This FREE NIE Program will show your sixth grade students how to become responsible members of the planet, and to respect all of the resources that it has to offer.

Downloads:

Flip Chart for Interactive White Boards
Note: Only classrooms with white boards will be able to run this file.

Complete supplement as PDF

Teachers Guide


Lesson plans for use with the e-Edition on Interactive White Boards

Included are basic lessons for an Elementary, Middle and Secondary classroom that can be utilized to introduce Language Arts and Social Studies activities.

Middle School Social Studies Lesson Plan
Middle and High School Language Arts Lesson Plan
High School Social Studies Lesson Plan
Elementary Social Studies Lesson Plan
Elementary and Middle School Language Arts Lesson Plan

USA Weekend Teacher Guides

New Teacher's Guides are available every Monday, complete with monthly themes highlighted in a weekly lesson and a monthly activity sheet.

Click here to download guides from USA Weekend


Common Core State Standard
SL.CCS.1/2/3/4 Grades 6-12: An essay of a current news event is provided for discussion to encourage participation, but also inspire the use of evidence to support logical claims using the main ideas of the article. Students must analyze background information provided about a current event within the news, draw out the main ideas and key details, and review different opinions on the issue. Then, students should present their own claims using facts and analysis for support.

FOR THE WEEK OF SEP. 24, 2007

Kid Nation TV show provokes ethical and quality criticisms

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Entertainment and lifestyle sections help newspaper readers pick shows, films, music, books and live events of interest. Invite students to tell how they use the paper to learn about pop culture, and to talk about a review or article they like.
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Articles about "Kid Nation" are by adults. Assign students who see the Wednesday night show to write what they think about it for a class "newspaper" or bulletin board display.
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Audience members don't always agree with professional critics, and some papers welcome viewer comments at the end of reviews or in website forums. Let students look for interactive exchanges about "Kid Nation" on the paper's site, where they can join the discussion with supervision or through teacher-posted comments.

A reality series about children supposedly left to fend for themselves in a made-for-TV "ghost town" called Bonanza began last week amid legal and ethical outcries. The groundbreaking CBS show -- "Kid Nation" -- focuses on 40 theoretically unsupervised children aged 8-15 who try to build a functioning society without adults on a ranch near Santa Fe, New Mexico. Participants receive $5,000 each, with one earning a weekly gold star worth $20,000.

Interest -- or curiosity, at least -- was fueled by state efforts to look into claims that children had been required to work 14-hour days during taping. Entertainment industry unions charged during the summer that kids were exploited and that unsafe conditions endangered cast and crew. CBS rebuffed an attempt to investigate compliance with child labor laws, saying the youngsters were in "an environment similar to that of a sleep-away camp" and that a producer acted "much like a summer camp counselor."
Show executives insist cast members set their own hours. "They were not working; they were participating," says executive producer Tom Forman, adding that psychologists and medics were present. Still, parents signed a 22-page agreement that mentions risks of "serious bodily injury, illness or death."

Most reviewers disliked the first episode intensely. An entertainment industry daily newspaper, Variety, called it "a mess," "creepy" and "a crime against television." To the Washington Post, it was "an appalling monstrosity." USA Today's critic sniped: "It was like watching some other family's incredibly dull home movies -- assuming in your home movies, the kids make speeches." The show continues on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. for 12 more weeks.

Writer says: "Would the creators of 'Kid Nation' please go to their room for a time-out and come up with something more original" -- Julie Hinds, Detroit Free Press pop culture writer

Network says: "These kids were in good hands and were under good care, with procedures and safety structures that arguably rival or surpass any school or camp in the country." -- Tom Forman, executive producer

Admirer says: "Its cast of teenagers and pre-teens were sometimes mean, frustrating or annoying, but they also proved themselves to be remarkably self-sufficient, smart, articulate, and funny. In short, they were real, and rather entertaining. . . . It's heartbreaking and inspiring at the same time." -- Andy Dehnart, MSNBC commentator

Front Page Talking Points is written by Alan Stamm for NIEonline.com, Copyright 2014
We welcome comments or suggestions for future topics: Click here to Comment

Front Page Talking Points Archive

Auto racing goes green: Battery-powered cars reach 140 mph in new Formula E series

Videogame ‘athletes:’ Are you college scholarship material?

Meet an extinct beast: Newly identified dinosaur had a 37-foot neck, 30-foot tail

E-cigarettes prompt new health concerns about young users, targeted with ads and flavors

Strong arm: Mo’ne Davis, 13, becomes a national baseball star with her blazing fastball

Fatal police shooting of unarmed teen focuses national attention on Ferguson, Missouri

NBA turning point: San Antonio Spurs hire Becky Hammon as assistant coach

Stay out of tanning booths and limit outdoor sun exposure, the government warns

Federal agency warns about health risk of Alert Energy and other pure caffeine products

Israeli response to missiles from Gaza spurs debate over media fairness and balance

Complete archive