Activities  Home  K-4  5-8  9-12   Geo Quiz   Vocabulary Quiz   NewsVideo   Cartoons   Talking Points  Science Webcast 



Additional Resources for Your Classroom



Find over 300 resources that include teacher guides, student supplements, teacher training modules and so much more.

Click here to access instructional material


Common Core State Standard
SL.CCS.1/2/3/4 Grades 6-12: An essay of a current news event is provided for discussion to encourage participation, but also inspire the use of evidence to support logical claims using the main ideas of the article. Students must analyze background information provided about a current event within the news, draw out the main ideas and key details, and review different opinions on the issue. Then, students should present their own claims using facts and analysis for support.

FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 17, 2010

Impact of Gulf of Mexico oil blowout widens as it flows into second month

frontpageactionpoints.gif
1.gif
Look for comments from your area or coverage reflecting the impact beyond Louisiana.
2.gif
Find a photo or graphic, such as a map, with a vivid look at what's happening in the Gulf of Mexico.
3.gif
The catastrophe affects discussions about energy policy, offshore drilling and alternative fuels. Can you spot an editorial, opinion column or reader comments about any long-term issues?

Undersea crude oil has gushed into the Gulf of Mexico near Louisiana since a fiery, deadly drilling accident April 20, and experts still were struggling to control the massive gusher as this week began. British Petroleum (BP), the main drilling company involved, is trying many ways to contain the gooey mess and skim it off coastal waters.

With the environmental disaster entering a second month Tuesday, the toll on marine life, birds, beach resorts and commercial fishing for shellfish and other catches is escalating daily. Louisiana license plates say "Sportsman's Paradise," but there's a huge economic cloud in paradise. Tourists are canceling hotel and charter boat reservations. Restaurants and supermarkets around the country are switching to farm-raised shrimp from South America or Asia as shortages already boost the cost of Gulf supplies.

In the scramble to stop the pollution, BP on Monday reported "good progress" threading a mile-long, six-inch tube with a rubber stopper into the 21-inch pipe spewing oil from the ocean floor. "We're really pleased that we're capturing some of the flow," a top executive said. The company hopes to halt the flow in about a week. In another new move, federal officials let BP spread chemicals underwater to break the oil into small drops and prevent it from reaching the surface or shore.
Cleanup efforts at the surface include controlled burning, skimming and an offbeat new tactic -- deploying nylon "booms" filled with donated human and pet hair that absorbs oil readily. (See video below.) An underwater strategy not yet attempted involves plugging the open pipe with bits of tires, golf balls and all kinds of junk -- sort of like purposely clogging a sink or toilet.

President says: "I'm not going to rest or be satisfied until the leak is stopped at the source, the oil in the Gulf is contained and cleaned up, and the people of the Gulf are able to go back to their lives and their livelihoods." -- President Obama, May 14 at White House

BP head says: "You can't have an incident of this seriousness and not expect significant changes [in drilling rules] as a consequence." -- Tony Hayward, chief executive

Fisherman says: "This is going to make Hurricane Katrina look like a drop in the bucket." -- Robert Campo, fourth-generation commercial fisherman in Shell Beach, La.

Multisource political news, world news, and entertainment news analysis by Newsy.com

Front Page Talking Points is written by Felix Grabowski and Alan Stamm for NIEonline.com, Copyright 2014
We welcome comments or suggestions for future topics: Click here to Comment

Front Page Talking Points Archive

Millions of miles from Earth, a U.S. spacecraft orbits Mars to explore its atmosphere

Auto racing goes green: Battery-powered cars reach 140 mph in new Formula E series

Videogame ‘athletes:’ Are you college scholarship material?

Meet an extinct beast: Newly identified dinosaur had a 37-foot neck, 30-foot tail

E-cigarettes prompt new health concerns about young users, targeted with ads and flavors

Strong arm: Mo’ne Davis, 13, becomes a national baseball star with her blazing fastball

Fatal police shooting of unarmed teen focuses national attention on Ferguson, Missouri

NBA turning point: San Antonio Spurs hire Becky Hammon as assistant coach

Stay out of tanning booths and limit outdoor sun exposure, the government warns

Federal agency warns about health risk of Alert Energy and other pure caffeine products

Complete archive