Forecast | Radar

Activate Account | Manage Account | Logout | Today's Paper
Today's Paper, also known as the e-Edition, is an online replica of the printed newspaper. You can view today's paper or previous issues.

Common Core State Standard
SL.CCS.1/2/3/4 Grades 6-12: An essay of a current news event is provided for discussion to encourage participation, but also inspire the use of evidence to support logical claims using the main ideas of the article. Students must analyze background information provided about a current event within the news, draw out the main ideas and key details, and review different opinions on the issue. Then, students should present their own claims using facts and analysis for support.


Mars discovery brings out of this world excitement

Space exploration is just one frontier making dramatic news. Find an article that touches on another area of science, engineering or information technology (computers).
NASA coverage gives a glimpse of exciting careers to consider. Look at other topics throughout the paper -- from entertainment pages to local news sections -- with an eye toward the jobs that are involved. Discuss which ones seem interesting, important and rewarding.
Though Mars is the most distant place in the news now, the paper is full of reports from far, far away. Spot an article or photo from somewhere across the world and then look for that place on a map or globe.

A remote-controlled spacecraft is expanding our knowledge of Mars, and NASA scientists are pumped about what a robotic arm dug up last week while rooting around in red Martian soil. Images beamed 170 million miles to Earth from the Phoenix lander confirm the presence of ice.

This puts us an essential step closer to answering the question behind three decades of Mars exploration and centuries of speculation: Could there have been life there? The new clue mean Mars might once have had liquid water, which is essential for life -- at least as it is known on Earth.

Though Mars is much too cold now to have liquid water on its surface, scientists believe that may not have always been true. Images from NASA missions in the 1970s showed channels and gullies, apparently carved by flowing liquid at some point in the planet's history. The current craft, which landed May 25 for a three-month mission, includes a digging tool at the end of a robotic arm that's nearly eight feet long.
Scientists now will do in-depth analysis to look for carbon, which forms the chemical backbone of proteins and fats. In addition to water, it is the major constituent of living cells and tissue.

NASA says: "It is with great pride and a lot of joy that I announce today that we have found proof that this hard, bright material is really water ice and not some other substance." -- Peter Smith, mission's principal investigator

Professor says: "We found what we were looking for. This tells us we have water ice within reach of the arm." -- Mark Lemmon of Texas A&M University, who works on the mission

Mars facts: Fourth planet from the sun in our solar system. About half the radius of Earth. Can be seen from Earth with the naked eye.

Front Page Talking Points is written by Felix Grabowski and Alan Stamm for NIEonline.com, Copyright 2015
We welcome comments or suggestions for future topics: Click here to Comment

Front Page Talking Points Archive

Scary times: More than 30 governors resist federal plans to bring Syrian war refugees

Evidence of cheating by Russian athletes could block some from 2016 Olympics

Screen time: See what digital media students typically look at and for how long

Obama takes new military step to fight ISIS extremist group in Syria

Health concerns lead to steady slide in soda drinking by U.S. students and adults

Why the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal is a big deal for our country

‘The Martian’ movie and a real-life NASA discovery put Mars in the news

Injury risks and slipping interest reshape high school football’s status in some districts

VW trickery on exhaust tests creates a cloud over all ‘clean diesel’ vehicles

Inspiring guest: Pope Francis begins six-day U.S. visit Tuesday

Complete archive