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Common Core State Standard
SL.CCS.1/2/3/4 Grades 6-12: An essay of a current news event is provided for discussion to encourage participation, but also inspire the use of evidence to support logical claims using the main ideas of the article. Students must analyze background information provided about a current event within the news, draw out the main ideas and key details, and review different opinions on the issue. Then, students should present their own claims using facts and analysis for support.

FOR THE WEEK OF JULY 07, 2008

Gulp 'n go light breakfast may backfire with weight gain

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Look for health-related coverage and discuss whether the information is clear and useful. Are any questions not answered?
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Medical news is one type of wellness information in the paper. Find items on summer exercise, healthful foods or staying safe during outdoor activities.
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Advertisers also share tips for eating well and staying fit. Discuss how and why information in paid ads should be evaluated differently than news content prepared by journalists.

Here's a new bit of diet research with a twist that may seem unlikely: Skipping breakfast or eating a light one can wind up making you heavier. That's right - a study shows that overweight women who ate half of their daily calories first thing in the morning lost more weight in the long term than those who started with a small, low-carbohydrate breakfast.
And those eating a balanced breakfast also are less likely to pile pounds back on.

A big breakfast helps you not to get hungry during the day and eat foods that are high in fat and sugar, such as candy, cookies and other fattening snacks. Nutrition experts say a morning meal packed with lean protein such as ham or turkey and carbohydrates from toast or rolls helps cut cravings for sweet or starchy foods, and boosts our metabolism (energy level) to burn calories.
Odd as it may sound, these folks would recommend a turkey sandwich over a tiny dish of berries and yogurt.

Study participants who ate just fruit or cereal after awakening reversed their initial progress toward a slimmer shape. "After a short period of weight loss, there is a quick return to obesity," notes a Virginia professor who recently presented the study of 96 ultra-heavy women at a San Francisco medical conference.
Having nothing but juice or milk before starting the day is even riskier than eating light. Skipping breakfast starves the body of nutrients and prompts it to store more of lunch and dinner as fat.

Study results: After four months, women who ate small breakfasts and those consuming larger ones lost about the same amount of weight on average -- 28 pounds for the small-breakfast group and 23 pounds for the big-breakfast group. But after eight months, small-breakfast eaters had regained 18 pounds and the others trimmed down an additional 16 pounds.

Researcher says: "Telling [obese people] to eat less and exercise more does not take into account feelings of carb cravings and hunger. We have to change our approach." -- Dr. Daniela Jakubowicz, clinical professor at Virginia Commonwealth University and new study's main author

Nutritionist says: "A healthy breakfast primes the metabolism so that you start burning fat immediately, instead of in the afternoon." -- Susie Burrell, Australian dietitian

Front Page Talking Points is written by Felix Grabowski and Alan Stamm for NIEonline.com, Copyright 2016
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