Forecast | Radar

Activate Account | Manage Account | Logout | Today's Paper
Today's Paper, also known as the e-Edition, is an online replica of the printed newspaper. You can view today's paper or previous issues.

Common Core State Standard
SL.CCS.1/2/3/4 Grades 6-12: An essay of a current news event is provided for discussion to encourage participation, but also inspire the use of evidence to support logical claims using the main ideas of the article. Students must analyze background information provided about a current event within the news, draw out the main ideas and key details, and review different opinions on the issue. Then, students should present their own claims using facts and analysis for support.


Facebook show and tell can sabotage college admission

Find coverage of another issue involving privacy, ethics or online activities.
Look for social media links or mentions in news reports. Do any columnists, or the paper itself, have a fan page that's promoted?
The Twitter micro-blogging service also is a popular way to connect with friends and keep up with breaking news directly from some journalists. Does this paper or any reporter share a Twitter address?

An important lesson for high school students has nothing to do with texts, tests or teachers. The lesson is to watch what you brag about and bare on social media or a personal blog. A bodacious MySpace photo or indiscreet Facebook post may be a deal-blocker in the eyes of campus admissions officers, who sometimes look at online profiles.

About a quarter of colleges and universities check prospective students' social network pages before offering admission or scholarships, says a survey released last month. "Most colleges will do whatever it takes to recruit the right type of student to their respective institution," explains Mark D. Weinstein, dean of enrollment at Grace College in Winona Lake, Ind.

Many employers also tap keyboards for background checks on job applicants, who could damage or derail themselves with racy videos, juvenile blog entries or albums full of party animal snaps. At some universities and corporations, applicants are asked for a link to their Facebook or MySpace pages.
Not surprisingly, some students think this sort of screening is snooping that's out of bounds. "It is extremely unethical to judge a person's social life by a networking site and it is total invasion of privacy," Kristen Sharaf of Pierce College in Woodland Hills, Calif., wrote this month in a student publication. Campus and business recruiters, she feels, "should be more concerned with the grades you are upholding and what you have to offer them. Personal and professional lives should be kept apart."

Educator says: "No school wants to give a prestigious scholarship to someone standing on a beer keg and wearing a lampshade." -- Nora Ganim Barnes, University of Massachusetts marketing professor

Student says: "I was in a sorority, so maybe there are some racy pics that people shouldn't see, but for the most part I'll take those down. If everyone can't see it, maybe it shouldn't be out there." -- Maggie Attashian, University of Nevada-Reno

Admissions counselor says: "Don't post anything that you don't want your mother or father or college admission officer to see." -- David Hawkins, director of public policy and research, National Association for College Admission Counseling

Front Page Talking Points is written by Felix Grabowski and Alan Stamm for NIEonline.com, Copyright 2015
We welcome comments or suggestions for future topics: Click here to Comment

Front Page Talking Points Archive

New way to roll: Motorized balance boards are glitzy, costly and a target of concerns

Scary times: More than 30 governors resist federal plans to bring Syrian war refugees

Evidence of cheating by Russian athletes could block some from 2016 Olympics

Screen time: See what digital media students typically look at and for how long

Obama takes new military step to fight ISIS extremist group in Syria

Health concerns lead to steady slide in soda drinking by U.S. students and adults

Why the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal is a big deal for our country

‘The Martian’ movie and a real-life NASA discovery put Mars in the news

Injury risks and slipping interest reshape high school football’s status in some districts

VW trickery on exhaust tests creates a cloud over all ‘clean diesel’ vehicles

Complete archive