Common Core State Standard
SL.CCS.1/2/3/4 Grades 6-12: An essay of a current news event is provided for discussion to encourage participation, but also inspire the use of evidence to support logical claims using the main ideas of the article. Students must analyze background information provided about a current event within the news, draw out the main ideas and key details, and review different opinions on the issue. Then, students should present their own claims using facts and analysis for support.

FOR THE WEEK OF AUG. 22, 2011

Dictionary update shows how English evolves to include woot, noob and upcycle

frontpageactionpoints.gif
1.gif
Look for any of the words mentioned or other examples of evolving language in news content.
2.gif
Now see if you spot slang or inside jargon, perhaps quoted in a sports report or business article.
3.gif
Discuss journalism's role in updating everyday language. What should reporters and editors consider when using informal or unfamiliar words?

You may need a new dictionary this new school year. About 400 words are added to one popular reference, the Oxford Concise English Dictionary, illustrating changes in everyday language. It's no shock that many technology-related words are among 12th edition newcomers. They include sexting, retweeting and cyberbullying, along with noob (properly spelled n00b) That shorthand for newbie is an unflattering term for a newcomer to a forum, game or trend.

Another fresh entry is woot (or w00t), an online way to say hooray. "The expression woot began in America, but was picked up very quickly by people in Britain as a result of the Internet breaking down international boundaries," says Angus Stevenson, editor of the dictionary. The book from Oxford University Press in England also adds updated definitions of familiar words. Thought a cougar was just an ornery wild cat? By now you probably know it's also "an older woman seeking a sexual relationship with a younger man."

Here's another: Textspeak is defined as any writing with lots of abbreviations, initials and emoticons, just as in text messages.
Not all added words may survive in the next edition, following the fate of cassette player -- too old school for the latest dictionary. It's a 240,000-word version of the authoritative Oxford English Dictionary, filled with 600,000 words and phrases. The smaller dictionary, first published in 1911, is meant to "cover the language of its own time," the publisher says.

Editor says: "New words come into currency much more quickly as a result of the Internet as people see friends, or friends of friends, using new words and copy them." -- Angus Stevenson of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary

Upcycle means: "To recycle into something worth more that the original." -- From new dictionary

Denialist means: "A person who refuses to admit the truth of a concept or proposition that is supported by the majority of scientific or historical evidence." -- From new dictionary

Front Page Talking Points is written by Felix Grabowski and Alan Stamm for NIEonline.com, Copyright 2017
We welcome comments or suggestions for future topics: Click here to Comment

Front Page Talking Points Archive

‘What Happened:’ Hillary Clinton revisits Campaign ’16 in her book and national tour

‘Democracy on the line:’ Supreme Court considers what’s legal when politicians redraw election district maps

As Puerto Rico struggles after devastating hurricane, Trump feels backlash about pace of help

Another climate change impact: Solidly frozen Alaskan permafrost is thawing

Scientists urge changes to ease impact of what flows down the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico

Eye-opening new book explores how phones and tablets affect ‘today’s super-connected kids’

As Houston works to recover from hurricane, possible role of climate change is studied

New approach for a persistent, costly U.S. challenge: What to do in Afghanistan?

Volley of threats between North Korea and U.S. cool down after tense exchanges

There goes the sun: Solar eclipse over U.S. next week is a big deal – and not just for astronomers

Complete archive